[Hardware] ASUS TUF GAMING B550M-PLUS and RTL8125B Realtek

Just switched some hardware parts in my main PC:

I moved from Intel to an AMD build. I kept my boot disk with Linux Mint 20 and everything was running out of the box, except there was no ethernet connection available. The RTL8125B Realtek network card is not yet supported on a Kernel < 5.9. Since I’m running Kernel 5.6.14, I had to manual install it.

Go to: https://www.realtek.com/en/component/zoo/category/network-interface-controllers-10-100-1000m-gigabit-ethernet-pci-express-software

Download the “2.5G Ethernet LINUX driver r8125 for kernel up to 5.6”, untar and follow the installation instructions from the README. In fact you only have to run

sudo ./autorun.sh
#check with
lsmod | grep r8125
ifconfig -a

[Hardware] A guide to monitor response times

Find the article here: A guide to monitor response times

“Response time” is basically the amount of time it takes for a pixel to change (“transition”) from one color to another, typically measured in milliseconds (ms). This is different from framerate or refresh rate of a monitor, typically measured in hertz (hz).

Here are some common refresh rates and their corresponding windows:

  • 60 hz = 1/60 = 16.67 ms
  • 75 hz = 13.33 ms
  • 100 hz = 10.00 ms
  • 120 hz = 8.33 ms
  • 144 hz = 6.94 ms
  • 240 hz = 4.167 ms

Any response time you see on a monitor box will most likely be “G2G” or gray to gray. Unsurprisingly, response times change depending on the color that is currently displayed and the color you wish to transition to.

To fully understand what a monitor is capable of, you have to consider both speed (response times) and accuracy (overshoot).

In theory, a 1 ms monitor with no accuracy issues would provide a very clean image. At 144hz, it would be displaying a frame every 6.94 ms. This means it would be transitioning for 1 ms, and providing a static image for the remaining 5.94 ms.

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